Notify Me Module Icon

Town Crier

  1. Type your email address in the box and select Sign In.
  2. If you want to receive text messages enter your phone number and select Save.
  3. To subscribe or unsubscribe click Email icon and/or SMS icon next to the lists to which you wish to subscribe/unsubscribe.
Available Lists
Sender Name:
Town of Chevy Chase
Sent By:
(Automatically Sent By Website)
Send Date:
4/27/2018 12:12:28 PM
Email Subject:
Message from Town Council Candidate Wicca Davidson

Formatted HTML message

Town Logo

My name is Wicca Davidson, and I am one of the five candidates hoping to fill one of the three available seats on the Town Council.  I can now say that I participated in my first Candidate Forum, been to 2 Meet & Greets, 1 meeting on the Purple Line, and knocked on hundreds of doors.  It has been great to put names and faces together after years of moderating the list serve.  

And if you were not at the Candidate’s Forum you missed my statement that the Town needs a mom, and I was volunteering. I suppose I did mean that, in the sense that I care how each person in the Town participates, interacts, and benefits from being a part of a small-Town Community. Although it wasn’t a planned part of my 90 second ending summary, I don’t regret saying it. 

What I left out of my summary was that I have been living on my own since I was 15, supporting myself, putting myself first through nursing school, and then in my 30’s, The University of North Carolina – Chapel Hill.  I was a nurse for 20 years and followed that as self-employed business person for 23 years. I supported my daughter and put her through college with no debt. I am a mom, but I am practical. I know how to make things happen. I follow through until the job is done. I understand budgets, money, and making tough decisions. I’ve been doing those things now for 41 years, and if elected I will bring that strength to the Town Council.

I’ve learned to ask for more information if I am asked questions, so I can answer with clarity. If elected I will continue to ask questions. Open-ended questioning often brings new information.  The ensuing conversations are a wonderful way to discover innovative solutions to seemingly intractable problems. The bonus is the possibility of sparking a friendship.

When I was pondering how to prepare for the Candidates Forum that ended just an hour before I began writing this final pre-election statement, I realized that one way I was preparing was being out and about town talking with Town residents. The questions I was being asked each day were my training.  

Here are just a few of the issues that my conversations have covered:

While there is still division in the Town regarding the Purple Line, we can all see the problems more visibly now (especially with trees cut down and the trail blocked off). There is a real need for proper mitigation before the Purple Line becomes operational. Many of the people who live along the closed trail/Purple Line are desperately worried. This worry is real.  The solutions will be complicated.  

Students walking to B-CC need a safe route. The Town needs to work with students, the school, and adjoining neighborhoods to create a usable and safe “trail” now that the old trail has gone. 

Bicyclists are now riding through the Town as their trail has vanished. We need a sensible plan to prevent accidents, ensure the safety of the bike riders, the pedestrians, and those who drive in the Town. Sometimes bicyclists are compliant and obey the rules of the road. Sometimes it is more like herding cats getting bike riders to stop at lights or follow a proscribed pathway through a town.

We need more ways to communicate – including looking at modern technologies. It is time to be creative with events that engage more people, and to think of new ways of reaching out to each other.  We need to embrace old school technologies as well.  They do still work.

There are 100s of households in the Town who only receive the Forecast and have no other meaningful connection or conversation with the Town. It is time to creatively involve those people, both so they can benefit from the many events and services the Town offers and the Town can benefit from the resources of an educated and talented populace.

While great strides have been made towards mitigating the impact of the growth on the edges of the Town through the work of past and current Town Councils, of CBAR, and cooperating with other communities on our edges.  It is important to continue building alliances with the other communities around us. We must keep working for green spaces and lowered building heights around Town.

It remains important to oversee what the Town spends and why. Even with our excellent Town Manager, Todd Hoffman, it is also the continuing responsibility of the Town Council to keep track of the Town’s finances.  The Town has a large reserve.  How much is saved and how much is spent is going to be the topic of many meetings.

A Dog Friendly Zone has been a big subject of conversation as I knock on doors.  The other topic I am hearing often regards giving Town residents who own property but are not US citizens the right to vote in the Town Elections.  I know both these issues will be coming before the new Town Council.  I support both, although there will be logistical conversations about care of the land with the dog friendly zone if that passes the Town Council, and as well some guidelines regarding voting rights.  As a person who has dual citizenship, I have a fondness for fellow immigrants.

2018 marks 100 years of the Town. While we celebrate this milestone, we must look to the future. We have both an aging population and many young families in Town. Assisting those who are aging in place as well as meeting the needs of growing families is an interesting challenge, and one I am eager to work on.

When I talk to people I am pointedly reminded that Council members must respect the minority voices in the Town. However, Council decisions should represent the wishes and the needs of the majority. The people living on Elm and Lynn streets are rightfully worried about trains, noise, and property values. People living on Connecticut notice the increased traffic and wonder about the impact of a metro stop a mile away. Parents worry about children getting to school safely, and the quality of those schools. The Bethesda Sector Plan implementation will affect us all. Some older people are lonely, and new parents are often isolated. These issues are all important. Each will impact the quality of our lives and our future. We must continue building a community that is rich and deep emotionally, as we work toward resolving the challenges we face as a Town.  My dream is to involve more people in our important discussions and in making workable plans.

On Saturday night we had a pipe burst in the wall and had 3” of standing water in our basement. Sunday morning I sent out messages on Town Neighbors and the Facebook group asking for help moving waterlogged rugs. Within minutes a new Town resident called me, 10 minutes later he was here, and in 15 minutes the rugs were outside. Last week I met a young woman from town who gave me great counsel on a difficult family problem. This is what a Town is. This is the reason I am running for Town Council. I want to continue working to bring our community closer, whether we are individually dealing with flooded basements or together as group dealing with the booming growth of Bethesda. I am not seriously asking to be the Town’s mom, but I am asking for your vote. 

Wicca Davidson
7600 Connecticut Ave
wicca@wiccadavidson.com
301-980-5596


Plain text message

My name is Wicca Davidson, and I am one of the five candidates hoping to fill one of the three available seats on the Town Council. I can now say that I participated in my first Candidate Forum, been to 2 Meet & Greets, 1 meeting on the Purple Line, and knocked on hundreds of doors. It has been great to put names and faces together after years of moderating the list serve.

And if you were not at the Candidate’s Forum you missed my statement that the Town needs a mom, and I was volunteering. I suppose I did mean that, in the sense that I care how each person in the Town participates, interacts, and benefits from being a part of a small-Town Community. Although it wasn’t a planned part of my 90 second ending summary, I don’t regret saying it.

What I left out of my summary was that I have been living on my own since I was 15, supporting myself, putting myself first through nursing school, and then in my 30’s, The University of North Carolina – Chapel Hill. I was a nurse for 20 years and followed that as self-employed business person for 23 years. I supported my daughter and put her through college with no debt. I am a mom, but I am practical. I know how to make things happen. I follow through until the job is done. I understand budgets, money, and making tough decisions. I’ve been doing those things now for 41 years, and if elected I will bring that strength to the Town Council.

I’ve learned to ask for more information if I am asked questions, so I can answer with clarity. If elected I will continue to ask questions. Open-ended questioning often brings new information. The ensuing conversations are a wonderful way to discover innovative solutions to seemingly intractable problems. The bonus is the possibility of sparking a friendship.

When I was pondering how to prepare for the Candidates Forum that ended just an hour before I began writing this final pre-election statement, I realized that one way I was preparing was being out and about town talking with Town residents. The questions I was being asked each day were my training.

Here are just a few of the issues that my conversations have covered:

While there is still division in the Town regarding the Purple Line, we can all see the problems more visibly now (especially with trees cut down and the trail blocked off). There is a real need for proper mitigation before the Purple Line becomes operational. Many of the people who live along the closed trail/Purple Line are desperately worried. This worry is real. The solutions will be complicated.

Students walking to B-CC need a safe route. The Town needs to work with students, the school, and adjoining neighborhoods to create a usable and safe “trail” now that the old trail has gone.

Bicyclists are now riding through the Town as their trail has vanished. We need a sensible plan to prevent accidents, ensure the safety of the bike riders, the pedestrians, and those who drive in the Town. Sometimes bicyclists are compliant and obey the rules of the road. Sometimes it is more like herding cats getting bike riders to stop at lights or follow a proscribed pathway through a town.

We need more ways to communicate – including looking at modern technologies. It is time to be creative with events that engage more people, and to think of new ways of reaching out to each other. We need to embrace old school technologies as well. They do still work.

There are 100s of households in the Town who only receive the Forecast and have no other meaningful connection or conversation with the Town. It is time to creatively involve those people, both so they can benefit from the many events and services the Town offers and the Town can benefit from the resources of an educated and talented populace.

While great strides have been made towards mitigating the impact of the growth on the edges of the Town through the work of past and current Town Councils, of CBAR, and cooperating with other communities on our edges. It is important to continue building alliances with the other communities around us. We must keep working for green spaces and lowered building heights around Town.

It remains important to oversee what the Town spends and why. Even with our excellent Town Manager, Todd Hoffman, it is also the continuing responsibility of the Town Council to keep track of the Town’s finances. The Town has a large reserve. How much is saved and how much is spent is going to be the topic of many meetings.

A Dog Friendly Zone has been a big subject of conversation as I knock on doors. The other topic I am hearing often regards giving Town residents who own property but are not US citizens the right to vote in the Town Elections. I know both these issues will be coming before the new Town Council. I support both, although there will be logistical conversations about care of the land with the dog friendly zone if that passes the Town Council, and as well some guidelines regarding voting rights. As a person who has dual citizenship, I have a fondness for fellow immigrants.

2018 marks 100 years of the Town. While we celebrate this milestone, we must look to the future. We have both an aging population and many young families in Town. Assisting those who are aging in place as well as meeting the needs of growing families is an interesting challenge, and one I am eager to work on.

When I talk to people I am pointedly reminded that Council members must respect the minority voices in the Town. However, Council decisions should represent the wishes and the needs of the majority. The people living on Elm and Lynn streets are rightfully worried about trains, noise, and property values. People living on Connecticut notice the increased traffic and wonder about the impact of a metro stop a mile away. Parents worry about children getting to school safely, and the quality of those schools. The Bethesda Sector Plan implementation will affect us all. Some older people are lonely, and new parents are often isolated. These issues are all important. Each will impact the quality of our lives and our future. We must continue building a community that is rich and deep emotionally, as we work toward resolving the challenges we face as a Town. My dream is to involve more people in our important discussions and in making workable plans.

On Saturday night we had a pipe burst in the wall and had 3” of standing water in our basement. Sunday morning I sent out messages on Town Neighbors and the Facebook group asking for help moving waterlogged rugs. Within minutes a new Town resident called me, 10 minutes later he was here, and in 15 minutes the rugs were outside. Last week I met a young woman from town who gave me great counsel on a difficult family problem. This is what a Town is. This is the reason I am running for Town Council. I want to continue working to bring our community closer, whether we are individually dealing with flooded basements or together as group dealing with the booming growth of Bethesda. I am not seriously asking to be the Town’s mom, but I am asking for your vote.

Wicca Davidson
7600 Connecticut Ave
wicca@wiccadavidson.com
301-980-5596

SMS message

Message from Town Council Candidate Wicca Davidson